Collected essay in philosophy

Selected Essays, Oxford University Press,pp.

Collected essay in philosophy

Time, and the transitoriness of all things, are merely the form under which the will to live, which as the thing-in-itself is imperishable, has revealed to Time the futility of its efforts. Time is that by which at every moment all things become as nothing in our hands, and thereby lose all their true value.

What has been exists no more; and exists just as little as that which hasnever been. But everything that exists has been in the next moment.

The Philosophy of Composition - Wikipedia

Hence something belonging to the present, however unimportant it may be, is superior to something important belonging to the past; this is because the former is a reality and related to the latter as something is to nothing.

A man to his astonishment all at once becomes conscious of existing after having been in a state of non-existence for many thousands of years, when, presently again, he returns to a state of non-existence for an equally long time.

This cannot possibly be true, says the heart; and even the crude mind, after giving the matter its consideration, must have some sort of presentiment of the ideality of time. This ideality of time, together with that of space, is the key to every true system of metaphysics, because it finds room for quite another order of things than is to be found in nature.

This is why Kant is so great. Of every event in our life it is only for a moment that we can say that itis; after that we must say for ever that it was.

Collected essay in philosophy

Every evening makes us poorer by a day. It would probably make us angry to see this short space of time slipping away, if we were not secretly conscious Collected essay in philosophy the furthest depths of our being that the spring of eternity belongs to us, and that in it we are always able to have life renewed.

But such a purpose might just as well be called the greatest folly, for that which in the next moment exists no more, and vanishes as completely as a dream, can never be worth a serious effort. Our existence is based solely on the ever-fleeting present. Essentially, therefore, it has to take the form of continual motion without there ever being any possibility of our finding the rest after which we are always striving.

Hence unrest is the type of existence. In a world like this, where there is no kind of stability, no possibility of anything lasting, but where everything is thrown into a restless whirlpool of change, where everything hurries on, flies, and is maintained in the balance by a continual advancing and moving, it is impossible to imagine happiness.

It cannot dwell where, as Plato says, continual Becoming and never Being is all that takes place. First of all, no man is happy; he strives his whole life long after imaginary happiness, which he seldom attains, and if he does, then it is only to be disillusioned; and as a rule he is shipwrecked in the end and enters the harbour dismasted.

Then it is all the same whether he has been happy or unhappy in a life which was made up of a merely ever-changing present and is now at an end.

Collected essay in philosophy

Meanwhile it surprises one to find, both in the world of human beings and in that of animals, that this great, manifold, and restless motion is sustained and kept going by the medium of two simple impulses — hunger and the instinct of sex, helped perhaps a little by boredom — and that these have the power to form the primum mobile of so complex a machinery, setting in motion the variegated show!

Looking at the matter a little closer, we see at the very outset that the existence of inorganic matter is being constantly attacked by chemical forces which eventually annihilates it.

While organic existence is only made possible by continual change of matter, to keep up a perpetual supply of which it must consequently have help from without.

Nevertheless it is only by means of this organic life that consciousness is possible. Accordingly this is a finite existence, and its antithesis would be aninfinite, neither exposed to any attack from without nor in want of help from without, and hence [Greek: The denial of the will to live reveals the way to such a state as this.

The scenes of our life are like pictures in rough mosaic, which have no effect at close quarters, but must be looked at from a distance in order to discern their beauty.

So that to obtain something we have desired is to find out that it is worthless; we are always living in expectation of better things, while, at the same time, we often repent and long for things that belong to the past.

We accept the present as something that is only temporary, and regard it only as a means to accomplish our aim. So that most people will find if they look back when their life is at an end, that they have lived their lifelong ad interim, and they will be surprised to find that something they allowed to pass by unnoticed and unenjoyed was just their life — that is to say, it was the very thing in the expectation of which they lived.

And so it may be said of man in general that, befooled by hope, he dances into the arms of death. Then again, there is the insatiability of each individual will; every time it is satisfied a new wish is engendered, and there is no end to its eternally insatiable desires. This is because the Will, taken in itself, is the lord of worlds; since everything belongs to it, it is not satisfied with a portion of anything, but only with the whole, which, however, is endless.

Collected Essays 5: Philosophy, Autobiography and Miscellany by H.P. Lovecraft

Meanwhile it must excite our pity when we consider how extremely little this lord of the world receives, when it makes its appearance as an individual; for the most part only just enough to maintain the body.

This is why man is so very unhappy. Life presents itself next as a task, the task, that is, of subsisting de gagner sa vie. If this is solved, then that which has been won becomes a burden, and involves the second task of its being got rid of in order to ward off boredom, which, like a bird of prey, is ready to fall upon any life that is secure from want.

So that the first task is to win something, and the second, after the something has been won, to forget about it, otherwise it becomes a burden. That human life must be a kind of mistake is sufficiently clear from the fact that man is a compound of needs, which are difficult to satisfy; moreover, if they are satisfied, all he is granted is a state of painlessness, in which he can only give himself up to boredom.

This is a precise proof that existence in itself has no value, since boredom is merely the feeling of the emptiness of life."The Philosophy of Composition" is an essay written by American writer Edgar Allan Poe that elucidates a theory about how good writers write when they write well.

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Most Anticipated, Too: The Great Nonfiction Book Preview The Millions GROUNDBREAKING. A career-defining book. - The New Yorker Sallie Tisdale is the author of seven books on such varied subjects as medical technology. „Alle Menschen haben den Kardialsinn, der dazu befähigt, nicht hartherzig zu sein gegenüber anderen Menschen.

Da die Ahnkönige (ergo) den Kardialsinn hatten, der dazu befähigte, nicht hartherzig gegenüber anderen Menschen zu sein, haben sie halt folglich Regulierungen, die nicht hartherzig waren gegenüber den Menschen, entstehen lassen. Madison Place Highlights include: GE® kitchen appliances Quality crafted custom designed flat paneled wood cabinets in kitchen with granite counters Impact resistant windows 18″ x 18″ Ceramic tile flooring in living areas on first floor Access control entry Full lawn maintenance Resort-Style Swimming Pool with .

φιλια [philia]. Greek term for friendship or amiability. In the philosophy of Empedocles, the constructive principle counter-acting the destructive influence of νεικος [neikos]. Aristotle regarded friendship as a crucial component of the good life..

Recommended Reading: Eros, Agape and Philia: Readings in the Philosophy of Love, ed. by Alan Soble (Paragon, ). The essays collected in this volume can be said to elaborate a philosophy of language and history adequate to the concept of this event.

A single matter, truly something like the "thing itself" of which Agamben writes in his essay on Plato's Seventh Letter, animates the works gathered together here.

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